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Frequently Asked Questions

Fetal Maternal Health

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The Panorama prenatal screen is designed for women of any age and ethnicity who are at least 9 weeks pregnant. It cannot currently be used by women carrying three or more babies (triplets and above), women who have used an egg donor or surrogate carrying more than one baby (twins or triplets), or those who have received a bone marrow transplant.


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Panorama can be performed as early as 9 weeks into the pregnancy.

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As early as nine weeks into your pregnancy, a simple blood draw can tell you if your baby is at higher risk for having Down syndrome and other common genetic conditions, as well as the sex of your baby. Non-invasive and highly accurate, Panorama identifies more than 99% of pregnancies affected with Down syndrome and has the lowest reported false positive rate of any prenatal screening test for the commonly screened chromosomal abnormalities: trisomy 21, trisomy 18, and trisomy 13.

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If you are interested in obtaining the Panorama test, you can start a conversation about non-invasive prenatal testing with your doctor on your first prenatal visit.

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Panorama only requires a simple blood draw from the mom.

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Panorama is able to determine the likelihood that the pregnancy could be affected with chromosome abnormalities including Down syndrome (trisomy 21), trisomy 18, trisomy 13, monosomy X and triploidy. Your doctor may also recommend additional chromosomal conditions (microdeletions) be screened for using Panorama. Microdeletion conditions on Panorama’s extended panel include 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, 1p36 deletion, Cri-du-chat syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. While it is not the sole purpose of the test, the sex of the baby can also be screened for using Panorama.

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Most results will be returned to your doctor within 10 - 14 working days.

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You will receive your results from your doctor’s office.

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When you get your Panorama results, your report may state the following:

  • Low Risk: A Low Risk result indicates that it is unlikely that your baby is affected by one of the conditions on the Panorama panel.
  • High Risk: A High Risk result does not mean the baby is affected; rather, it indicates a higher than average chance that the baby has a chromosome abnormality. Your healthcare provider may recommend that you speak with a genetic counselor and or maternal fetal medicine specialist. You may be offered invasive diagnostic testing such as amniocentesis or CVS. No irreversible pregnancy decisions should ever be made based on a Panorama result alone.
  • No Result: In a small percentage of cases, Panorama may not be able to obtain sufficient information from your blood sample to determine an accurate result. If this occurs, a second blood sample may be requested.
Answer:

Typically, you will receive your Panorama screen results from the healthcare provider who ordered the test. If you have specific question about your results, we encourage you to speak with your healthcare provider.